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reducing pH prior to heat make whey protein recove

Printed From: Dairy Science and Food Technology
Category: General dairy
Forum Name: General dairy
Forum Description: Dairy science and technology matters not covered elsewhere
URL: https://www.dairyscience.info/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=125
Printed Date: 10 Dec 2022 at 1:44am
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Topic: reducing pH prior to heat make whey protein recove
Posted By: Guests
Subject: reducing pH prior to heat make whey protein recove
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:27pm
If reduce the pH of milk slightly prior to heat,we can recover the whey protein which is usually be discarded in cheesemaking.

the pH affect the pattern of association of whey protein onto the surface of casein micelles.at pH 6.35 the whey protein forms cluster on the surface of casein micelles,thus less surface is hold ,so rennet still work well.

this process is very useful where the whey protein products are not well developed ,such as in china.

the paper is :A.J. Vasbinder C.G. de kruif casein-whey protein interactions in milk heated at pH 6.35-6.9



Replies:
Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:28pm
Originally posted by childream childream wrote:

If reduce the pH of milk slightly prior to heat,we can recover the whey protein which is usually be discarded in cheesemaking.

the pH affect the pattern of association of whey protein onto the surface of casein micelles.at pH 6.35 the whey protein forms cluster on the surface of casein micelles,thus less surface is hold ,so rennet still work well.

this process is very useful where the whey protein products are not well developed ,such as in china.

the paper is :A.J. Vasbinder C.G. de kruif casein-whey protein interactions in milk heated at pH 6.35-6.9
Yes whey proteins can be incorporated into the coagulam by using heat, and combinations of heat + low pH. While this can increase yield there are other factors that must also be considered before using this approach commercially.

M
 


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:28pm
I did not talk about ricotta cheese nor queso blanco.

ruduce pH (6.35) PRIOR to heat,(80C ,10min),the whey protein will be denatured and form clusters adhereing onto the surface of casein micelles,then use rennet to coagulate the heanted milk .

we could recover whey protein as a part of the protein network with little or no changes of the characteristics of the milk gel.

If do not reduce pH prior to heat, whey protein will be associated with casein micelles uniformly thus more k-caseins are associated with whey protein ,then rennet will not work as well as with unheated milk.

this process can make normal cheese ( not ricotta or queso blanco)with whey protein recovered,so it is very useful in developing regions.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:28pm
thank you for your link


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:29pm
when heat milk for making yoghurt,the whey protein is denatured.

and the quantity of serum casein decrease as tempareture increase.

if I cool the hot milk, will the quantity of serum casein increase? or the coating of casein micelles of denatured whey protein will affect the release of serum casein???

I think that if we heat milk until whey protein is denatured,then cool the milk to release serum casein,and add organic acid ,at last ,heat until milk gel formed,can we get much stronger milk gel?

the process in which LAB is applied coule be developed by a little changes,isn't it?


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:29pm


I also have my own dairy forum ,but it is in chinese...




Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:29pm
Thank you for the link. I look forward to being able to read the content in English. I am sure that i have seen a translation tool from Chinese to English.

Your graphics are good!

Regards

M


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 10:29pm
translation tool usually works poorly...

it is very interesting that most of the posts on my dairy forum are translated from English by me.because the dairy science is not well dveloped in china.

the articles I translated are from:Fankhauser's cheese page,M.Kalab's pages on the microstructure of dairy food, dairy education series of U o Guelph(I like most), New England Cheesemaking Supply company's pages......and many official websites of famous cheese such as camembert, Emmental, Gouda, Roquefort etc...

so , in fact, you do not need a translation tool ...

I learnt dairy science from 10.2006 by internet,and my major is not about food at all.so I believe that more useful posts will be finished in the future.

and thank you for your forum where I could communicate with many dairy researchers.



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