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Milk densities

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IngredientJobs View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 Jun 2017 at 12:36pm
This is very useful information
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Feb 2017 at 1:37pm
There are several text books that provide data on the density of milk and milk products.

If you are a SDT member then the Handbook of Dairy technology which is free to members may be of some help. The information there is limited.

The Dairy Processing handbook published by Tetra Pak Processing Systems AB S-221 86 Lund, Sweden has more information and can be downloaded from the web.

The University of Guelph's excellent dairy Ebook site (https://www.uoguelph.ca/foodscience/book-page/physical-properties-milk) has tables of data that may help.

The following text books are worth buying for your company library. They both deal with physical properties of milk.

Goff, H.D. and Hill, A.R. 1993. Chemistry and physics. In: YH Hui (Ed), Dairy Science and Technology
Handbook, Vol. 1: Principles and Properties. VCH Publishers, New York, pp. 1-62.

Walstra, P., Wouters, J.T.M and Geurts, T. J. 2006. Dairy Technology, 2nd Ed. CRC/Taylor & Francis.

The text books will also provide information on regression equations that you can use to estimate the density of milk. One is given below:

Density of milk = 1.003073 - 0.000179t - 0.000368F + 0.00374TS
where t = temperature in degrees C; F = percentage fat; and TS = percentage nonfat solids

There is a lot of information. However it is in multiple places! Hope this helps.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Clarky2202 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Feb 2017 at 11:23am
Thanks, specific gravity reference are easy to find but densities are proving to be difficult .
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Feb 2017 at 10:57am
Thanks for this. I had intended to post some information on density of milk and conversion factors with references. I will post the key information over the next day or so.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Clarky2202 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Feb 2017 at 1:15am
Is anyone aware of a uk scientific reference of milk densities for use in a weight to volume conversion???
Thanks
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