Print Page | Close Window

What is MSNF in cream

Printed From: Dairy Science and Food Technology
Category: Ice cream
Forum Name: Ice cream
Forum Description: Science and technology of ice cream
URL: https://www.dairyscience.info/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=134
Printed Date: 02 Jul 2020 at 7:58am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 12.03 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: What is MSNF in cream
Posted By: Guests
Subject: What is MSNF in cream
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 11:01pm
Help plaese.

I make up our ice cream mixes. I know the fat of the cream we use but not its MSNF value. I have been using 9% for the last few years. Is there any fast way of working MSN knowing fat level in cream.



Replies:
Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 11:01pm
Milk Solids-non-fat


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 11:02pm
Milk Solids-non-fat,including lactose,caseins,whey proteins and minerals.

you can refer this page:
http://www.foodsci.uoguelph.ca/dairyedu/icingr.html#msnf - http://www.foodsci.uoguelph.ca/dairyedu/icingr.html#msnf


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 11:02pm
dad wrote:
Help plaese.

I make up our ice cream mixes. I know the fat of the cream we use but not its MSNF value. I have been using 9% for the last few years. Is there any fast way of working MSN knowing fat level in cream.




Cream can be regarded as a mixture of fat in an aqueous phase called serum that contains lactose, proteins and salts. The serum solids can be called by several different names e.g. MILK SOLIDS NOT FAT (MSNF). The skim milk or milk serum can be assumed to contain about 9% MSNF.

Given cream containing 40 % fat, the MSNF component supplied by say 20 kg of cream can be calculated as follows.

• Since 100 kg of cream at 40 % fat is equivalent to 40 kg of cream and 60 kg of MSNF, the MSNF in the 60 kg is 60*0.09 = 5.4 kg

• MSNF supplied by 20 kg of cream containing 40% fat
=20 *0.054
= 1.08 kg

Similarly the quantity of MSNF supplied by 20 kg of cream containing 25% fat can be calculated as follows:

• The MSNF is present in the 75 kg of milk serum. The MSNF component represents 0.09* 75 = 6.75 kg.
MSNF supplied by 20 kg of cream containing 25% fat
=20 *0.0675
= 1.35 kg



This approach yields approximate values and calculation of the actual MSNF concentration is always advisable.


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 11:02pm
Thank you for this! Your elp is apprecaited.

Sugar is expesve and we are thinking of using Corn Syrup. There seems to be some problems with this? Cannot get straight answer.

Is there a downside to using corn syrup?

Anyone help?

Dad


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 22 Mar 2010 at 11:02pm
There are no technological problems in using corn syrup preparations in ice cream. There are some groups in the US that believe corn syrup preparations may contribute towards the obesity epidemic in the US. While some may argue that this is a somewhat simplistic argument in the wider obesity debate it is an area that you should be aware of for marketing reasons at least. I suggest that you do a search on Goggle for obesity + fructose + mechanism to see the results of some of the latest research in this area.

For a range of reasons I would prefer to close down further postings on this topic.


Posted By: gpinzone
Date Posted: 10 Jan 2014 at 3:45am
I have a question. I calculated MSNF in heavy cream, half and half, and whole milk using this method:
  1. Find the item on http://nutritiondata.self.com/.  Here are the direct links for http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/51/2 - heavy cream , http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/48/2 - half and half , and http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/69/2 - whole milk . http://nutritiondata.self.com/ -
  2. Get the nutritional data for 1 cup of fluid. For heavy cream (listed as "Cream, fluid, heavy whipping"), make sure you change the "serving size" drop-down.
  3. Take the total weight and subtract the fat weight and water weight to get the MSNF weight. For heavy cream, this would be 238g - 88g - 137g = 13g.
  4. To find the percentage, just divide the MSNF weight and divide by total weight. For heavy cream: 13g/238g = 5.46%.

Is this valid? Am I missing something by doing it this way?



Posted By: Admin
Date Posted: 04 Jun 2016 at 9:21pm
Apologies for delay in approving this post. It was hidden in pages of SPAM.

I have not checked your calculation but would urge a little caution. The terms heavy cream do not specify the precise fat content. These terms normally cover a range of fat concentrations.



Print Page | Close Window

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.03 - http://www.webwizforums.com
Copyright ©2001-2019 Web Wiz Ltd. - https://www.webwiz.net