Fat agglomeration is affected by the process parameters used in gelato and ice cream manufacture, the emulsifer stabiliser system and ingredients. Fat agglomeration has a significant role in dryness of extruded ice cream, slow meltdown, good shape retention and resistance to shrinkage during storage. Too much protein can result in an over stable fat emulsion and insufficient fat agglomeration. 

A calculator to determine the maximum MSNF compatible with normal fat agglomeration has been added and can be accessed here.

 

The latest forum post concerns raw milk and A2 milk. The posts can be viewed at https://www.dairyscience.info/forum/where-to-buy-raw-milk-in-uk_topic454.html .

 

There is a legislative requirement in most developed countries for food companies to have validated-HACCP plans for all products. The current E.coli 01507:H7 outbreak in Scotland has been linked to raw milk cheese and the death of one child has been reported. Note there are few examples of well validated HACCPs even from large companies!

There are a number of published risk assessements for raw milk cheeses. One of the most comprehensive, "Microbiological Risk Assessment of Raw Milk Cheese", has been produced by Food Standards Australia /New Zealand using quantitative models developed by the University of Tasmania. The assesment can be downloaded from https://www.foodstandards.gov.au/code/proposals/documents/P1007%20PPPS%20for%20raw%20milk%201AR%20SD3%20Cheese%20Risk%20Assessment.pdf .

Recent deaths associated with the consumption of lettuce and other salad vegetables have been well publicised in the media. How do you advise parents to respond to the risks associated with eating salads and maintain consumption of healthy foods? And would this advice differ if they had an immunocompromised family member? Perhaps you have a view on my response to a query from a parent?  Please see http://www.dairyscience.info/forum/preparing-salads_topic432.html .

Is Thermus thermophilus the causal agent of pinking in cheese?

“Pinking” the development of a red / pink colour in many cheese-types has been known for many years and has been the attention of significant research interest for decades. Much of this research has been inconclusive although some association with lactobacilli has been suggested.

Recently Quigley et. al. (2016) used shotgun metagenomic sequencing to reveal the presence of bacteria corresponding to three phyla, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Deinococcus-Thermus in 8 ‘continental’ cheeses exhibiting pinking. The phylum Deinococcus-Thermus was absent in control cheese.

I purchased one pot of fat-free-natural yoghurt produced by a major dairy company from the Asda supermarket in Cookstown a few days ago. I opened it this lunchtime today (12th June). It had a use before date of the 24th June 2014 (see below).

 

 

 

I noticed the lumps, clumps of curd on the lid immediately. See below.

 

 

Looking at the inside of the container the top part of the yoghurt was less viscous than the bottom, syneresis was starting and grains/lumps/nodules were clearly visible.

 

The grains / nodules can be clearly seen on the spoon images below.

 

 

 

 

 

It is always interesting to see how companies respond to problems. No one answered the contact phone number given on the carton. I also completed a web form on the company website and attempted to contact their PR company using the information on their website. The contact information was not correct however I managed to get the correct information from their website.  I eventually got a response of sorts from the website form.

 

This is the second time in a month that I have bought a stirred yoghurt with this fault. The first time was from a local company in Northern Ireland and it was a natural yoghurt made with whole milk.

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